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Secure freight

Overview

Secure FreightA variety of technologies are used to screen air cargo, and new technologies are under development. However, much of the equipment currently certified for use, particularly in the United States, is most appropriate for the passenger screening environment and is ill-suited to the air cargo environment where palletized or other consolidated shipments are the norm. TIACA believes government authorities should expedite development, review and deployment of technologies geared towards the air cargo environment.

It is essential that new technological options be made available soon. Without equipment capable of screening consolidated shipments, there could be considerable disruption to air cargo commercial flows in a 100% screening environment. Furthermore, in an environment where cargo-specific screening technology is nonexistent or limited in availability, we believe governments should strongly consider expanded use of canine screening teams for air cargo, to help meet air cargo screening mandates.

 

TIACA View

Principles Toward the Development of Cargo Screening Technologies

New technologies geared towards the air cargo environment are urgently needed, particularly as we approach the August 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo shipped on passenger aircraft. More...

Reports/Papers

This section features incisive analysis of current issues that are critical to the air cargo industry.  

Reports

Papers

07/14/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
06/30/2010
The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) concludes that, while TSA has made progress towards meeting the August 1, 2010 100% air cargo screening mandate, challenges remain – particularly with respect to foreign inbound. GAO also raises questions about TSA’s ability to verify self-reported screening data and notes the lack of equipment for screening air cargo.
06/25/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
06/25/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
06/11/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
06/03/2010
As part of its efforts to meet the August 1 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger airlines, TSA increased some screening requirements as of May 1. TSA has provided a public letter to stakeholders describing the changes. Full SSI details are available on the TSA web boards.
06/02/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
05/20/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
04/30/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
03/26/2010
Learn the latest developments on TSA’s Certified Cargo Screening Program and the countdown to the August 1, 2010 deadline for 100% screening of air cargo on passenger planes.
12/10/2009
The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) presented testimony to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation in December 2009 assessing the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) progress in meeting congressionally mandated requirements for comprehensive screening of air cargo (effective August 2010) and 100% scanning of maritime cargo (effective July 2012). While GAO credits DHS for making considerable progress, it also details various remaining challenges.
11/18/2009
TIACA attended a DHS Air Cargo forum in Washington D.C. on December 14, 2009, at which TSA and industry stakeholders sought to expand existing outreach efforts to better inform shippers and other air cargo supply chain members of the pending August 2010 deadline for 100% piece level screening of air cargo transported on passenger aircraft. To avoid widespread delays, greater participation in the Certified Cargo Screening Program (CCSP) is needed.
12/02/2008
In response to frequent queries about the benefits of the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrosim (C-TPAT), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has developed a brochure. Among other things, CBP says "C-TPAT importers are 4 to 6 times less likely to incur a security or compliance examination" than are non-C-TPAT participants.

01/06/2009
A multi-year effort by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to obtain additional data elements for maritime shipments is now moving from the conceptual to the implementation stage, with importers and vessel carriers facing new requirements for security filings as of January 25, 2009.

News

FAQs

Q. What are some of the different technologies used to screen air cargo?

A. The different technologies utilized to screen air cargo include: x-ray, metal detectors, physical searches, explosive detection systems (EDS), canine, and explosive trace detection (ETD).

Q. What is the difference between piece-level screening and consolidated screening of air cargo?

A. Piece-level screening applies to each piece of cargo in a pallet, which is screened individually, as opposed to screening the pallet itself.

Q. How is screening of air cargo performed in the US?

A. TSA currently requires screening of air cargo at the piece level. Screening may be done by participants in the Certified Cargo Screening Program (CCSP) or by the airlines. Specific screening methods, as identified in the so-called 9/11 Act are x-ray, metal detectors, physical searches, explosive detections systems (EDS), canine, explosive trace detection (ETD), and any additional methods that may be approved by the TSA.

Q. Do other countries maintain the same air cargo screening requirements as the United States?

A. Each country has established its own air cargo security regime, and members of the air cargo supply chain must ensure they are in compliance. TIACA supports harmonization fo security regimes in order to clarify and standardize global operations and compliance efforts.

Download FAQs to PDF

Useful Links

The Homeland Security Europe website includes information on aviation security, specifically air cargo security and the different methods and technologies utilized for screening.
Transport Canada's website on air cargo security screening technology projects.
The TSA's air cargo programs and initiatives website includes information on specific programs.